Northern Ireland

  1. Watch the video and listen to the story about Northern Ireland and its capital – Belfast, told by the woman who was born there. Mark the sentences TRUE or FALSE. Correct the false sentences.

  1. The narrator was born in Belfast but then moved to another place.

  2. The Titanic was built in Northern Ireland.

  3. Narrator`s grandfather was on the Titanic when the tragedy happened.

  4. Titanic Belfast is a department store which was opened in 2012.

  5.  Belfast has a lot of fabulous architecture from the Victorian Era.

  6. The road between Belfast and the causeway coast stretches for about 450 miles.

  7. The Giant`s Causeway is a UNESCO world heritage site.

  8. Bushmills distillery is the oldest whiskey distillery in the UK.

  9. From top to bottom of Northern Ireland is about two hours driving time.

2. Read the following text about Irish food customs and choose the correct alternative.

Food in Daily Life. The diet is rather simple. Porridge or oatmeal often is eaten at breakfast. At midmorning, one stops for a cup of tea or coffee with cookies or biscuits. Most people eat the main meal at midday. This meal generally is meat-based, featuring beef, chicken, pork, or lamb. Fish and chips are eaten for a quick meal, and a rich soup with plenty of bread can be bought in taverns at lunchtime. Potatoes are a staple, but onions, cabbage, peas, and carrots are eaten just as frequently. Irish stew combines the chief elements of the cuisine with mutton, potatoes, and onions.

Bakeries carry a variety of breads, with brown bread and white soda bread served most often with meals. White sliced bread is called pan in Irish. Belfast's soda bread enjoys an excellent reputation; made of flour and buttermilk it is found throughout the country. In the evening, families eat a simple meal of leftovers or eggs and toast.

A drink generally means beer, either lager or stout. Guinness, brewed in Dublin, is the black beer most often drunk. Whiskey also is served in pubs, and coffee is also available.

Food Customs at Ceremonial Occasions. Food customs of the Northern Irish are not really different from the practices of the Irish in the Republic of Ireland. Christmas supper includes meat such as chicken and ham followed by plum pudding. Being a strongly Catholic country, the Friday night prohibition of meat is observed by Catholics. Since fish is permitted, the Friday evening meal generally features trout or salmon.

Choose the correct alternative.

  1. Porridge or oatmeal often is eaten at _______.

  1. Breakfast

  2. Midmorning

    1. The main meal at midday is generally based on ________.

  1. Chicken, beef, pork or lamb

  2. Fish and chips

    1. Potatoes, onions, cabbage, peas, and carrots are eaten _________.

  1. Rarely

  2. Frequently

    1. White sliced bread is called ______ in Irish.

  1. Pan

  2. Soda bread

    1. In the evening, families eat a simple meal of __________________.

  1. leftovers or eggs and toast

  2. bread and water

    1. Guinness, ____________, is the black beer most often drunk.

  1. Brewed in Dublin

  2. Brewed in Belfast

    1. Food customs of the Northern Irish are _____________ practices of the Irish in the Republic of Ireland.

  1. The same as

  2. Different from

    1. Christmas supper includes meat such as __________.

  1. chicken and ham

   2. pork and lamb

3. Choose one topic below and prepare a 2 minutes talk for the next lesson. Be ready to ask 5 questions on the topic of your talk.

1. The main symbols of Northern Ireland

2. Titanic

3. Giant`s Causeway

4. Sports of Northern Ireland

5. Traditional holidays

6. Famous citizens of Northern Ireland

7. Popular tourist destinations